Author Archive

Climate Week 2015: Climate Science Challenge

This year we celebrated Climate Week with a public event at Manchester Museum inviting visitors to take part in our Climate Science Challenge. Over 1,200 visitors joined in our celebrations, and together with researchers and students from British Antarctic Survey, Liverpool John Moores University, Manchester Metropolitan University, and the University of Manchester, took part in hands-on activities and experiments, exploring a range of climate change issues.   Taking on the Climate Science Challenge As part of the event, visitors were invited to join in our challenge by speaking to researchers and taking part in their own experiments to find the answers to important climate change...

Interview: Powering the Top of the World

Powering the Top of the World is a new documentary by Christoph Mazur and Chris Emmott, from Imperial College London. It explores energy supply in Nepal, and the innovative solutions to sustainable energy provision in some of the most remote parts of the world. With over 1.2 billion people with no access to electricity across the globe, these issues are echoed in countries the world over. Christoph Mazur speaks to Climatica about their work in Nepal, the moviemaking process, and their night at the BAFTAs.     Tell us about your new film ‘Powering the top of the world’ You’re a researcher first and foremost, what...

Volcanoes and climate change

What happens to the atmosphere when volcanoes erupt? Can volcanic eruptions lead to climate change? In 2010 the eruption of Eyjafjallajökull in south Iceland brought air traffic in northern Europe to a standstill for almost seven days. Now, the Bárðarbunga volcano, which has erupted beneath the Dyngjujökull glacier in central Iceland, is being intensively studied by scientists. On average, there are around 50-60 volcanic eruptions around the world each year. When volcanoes erupt, they can emit huge volumes of gases, aerosols, and volcanic ash into the stratosphere (part of the atmosphere at around 10-45 km altitude http://climatica.org.uk/climate-science-information/earth-system). With all of this material, we might expect...

Shouldn’t climate scientists try harder at communicating their findings?

Public interest in climate change has exploded over the last decade. The increased exposure of public audiences to the scientific discourse, however, is not always straightforward. By the time scientific understanding has migrated to the public domain it has often been distilled multiple times, by multiple parties. This can lead to misinterpretation of the original message. Given this, shouldn’t climate scientists try harder at communicating their findings direct to the public? This isn’t to say that science-public interaction is anything new. A great number of climate scientists already engage very effectively in science outreach through television, radio, newspapers, blogs and social media outlets, to name...