Posts tagged "precipitation"

IPCC special: Future climate phenomena and regional climate change

The latest report of Working Group I of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) combines new and better observations with improved models to provide a clearer and more definite picture of humanity’s influence on the climate system, and the paths we can choose for the future. The atmosphere continues to warm, with the last three decades each being warmer than the one before, and all three being warmer than any other decade since reliable observations began in the 1850s. Warming is seen almost everywhere on the Earth’s surface, and many observed changes are unprecedented on scales of decades to millennia. We also now have...

IPCC special: Long-term climate projections

Chapter 12 of the 5th Assessment Report of IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change) deals with future projections of climate change in the long-term. Long-term in this case means beyond the middle of the 21st century when the projections start to depend more strongly on the pathway or scenario of emissions of greenhouse gases, principally CO2. We rely extensively on computer models of the climate system for this as, obviously, there are no observations of the future. While computer models are not completely accurate in their ability to project future climate change, it is possible to use our understanding of the climate system to assess uncertainties...

Alpine plants and recent climate change

Alpine plants grow above the altitudinal tree-line in mountains around the world. Because alpine plants grow in areas with low summer and winter temperatures, very low night temperatures, frost, short growing-season, high winds, or extended snow-lie, and grow very slowly, it is widely accepted that alpines grow in such extreme habitats because of their physiological tolerance or requirement for cold conditions and/or their intolerance to competition from taller, more rapidly growing lowland or montane plants. Some, but certainly not all, alpines can, with care, be successfully grown in lowland gardens in the absence of competition from tall plants. Alpine plants are thus potentially sensitive to climate...